Welcome to Tailwater Press

Santa Barbara Architecture

from Spanish Colonial to Modern

First published in 1975 and now out of print, it is not an exaggeration to say that this book was notably the first comprehensive compendium of the area’s architecture ever published, and it remains so to this day—a classic.

Master Architects of Southern California
1920-1940

Gordon B. Kaufmann

Master Architects of Southern California 1920-1940, a new 12-volume series by Marc Appleton, Bret Parsons, and Steve Vaught, showcases the work of the Golden Era’s most important residential architects, featuring some of the earliest known architectural photography of their work. The series is devoted to the era when oil titans, film industry moguls, bankers, and successful entrepreneurs hired the most accomplished and talented architects they could find. In the premiere volume, GORDON B. KAUFMANN, the authors showcase 21 projects by the architect, including his design for Greystone, the mansion created for E.L. Doheny Jr. and Lucy Doheny, that catapulted him to the top of his field. 

Master Architects of Southern California
1920-1940

Roland E. Coate

In ROLAND E. COATE, the authors focus on one of the most admired and influential residential architects ever to practice in Southern California. In a remarkable career that spanned more than three decades, Roland E. Coate produced hundreds of exceptional designs from Santa Barbara to Bel-Air, Hollywood, Hancock Park, and Pasadena that ranged from quaint bungalows to grand mansions. Coate’s ability to work in a variety of styles from English Tudor to Monterey Colonial with equal grace made him a favorite with those seeking the very best. His client list” “with names like Doheny, O’Melveny, Hoover, and Hertz” “reads like a “Who’s Who” of the most important and influential figures of the era.

Master Architects of Southern California 1920-1940

Wallace E. Neff

Master Architects of Southern California 1920-1940, a new twelve-volume series by Marc Appleton and Bret Parsons showcases the work of the Golden Era’s most important residential architects as originally featured in the earliest issues of The Architectural Digest. Featuring some of the earliest known photographs of the work of legendary architects, the series is devoted to the era when oil titans, film industry moguls, bankers, and successful entrepreneurs who were new to the region hired the most accomplished and talented architects they could find.

 

Railroad Depots

A Southern Pacific Collection by Jean-Guy Tanner Dubé

Awarded the national Leicester B. Holland Prize for 2017 by the National Park Service and Library of Congress, professional draftsman and apprenticing architect Jean-Guy Dubé has researched and written about Southern Pacific depots since 1983. This book features 48 black and white blueprint drawings by Dubé, spanning many decades, styles and subject matter. Each blueprint, from the first tape measurement to the finished product took several months to complete. This is the first compilation of his drawings. While his work primarily includes standard and unique depots, this book also includes a handful of individual railroad built buildings and a few non-railroad buildings.

Myron Hunt

At Occidental Collage by Robert Winter

An exhibit on the powerful modern-era architect, designer of much of Occidental College campus: Myron Hunt.

George Washington Smith

An Architect’s Scrapbook

Culled from the remains of an original scrapbook comes a long-overdue publication of the work of an architect who all but defined the Spanish Colonial Revival of the early twentieth century. Containing magazine articles and photographs published during Smith’s lifetime, this book is an essential addition to the library of any student, practitioner or aficionado of Southern California Architecture. It also contains a brief introduction written by Marc Appleton.

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The Steedman Silver

Tailwater Press / 2019 (120 Pages)

George Fox Steedman had an extraordinarily successful career as a businessman in St. Louis in the early twentieth century. But his place in history is more likely secured by a house he and his wife Carrie built in Montecito, California, in 1925. Designed by George Washington Smith, an undisputed master of the Spanish Colonial Revival style, the house and its eleven-acre garden were designated as a National Historic Landmark in 2009 and are publicly accessible on a regular schedule.

 

Paul Williams Cover

Master Architects of Southern California 1920-1940 – Paul R. Williams

Master Architects of Southern California 1920-1940, a twelve-volume series produced by Marc Appleton and Bret Parsons showcases the work of the Golden Era’s most important residential architects as originally featured in the earliest issues of The Architectural Digest. Featuring some of the earliest known photographs of the work of legendary architects, the series is devoted to the era when oil titans, film industry moguls, bankers, and successful entrepreneurs who were new to the region hired the most accomplished and talented architects they could find.